Curlycurl skincare: What is the purpose of hyaluronic acid?

Hyaluronic acid, whether it be in its purest form or as part of a solution, is the skin’s best ally throughout the winter since it draws and holds onto more water within the skin, protecting and plumping it up while keeping it from drying out. Unquestionably, it is one of the most well-liked skincare compounds of recent years, and it can be found in many of our favorite face exfoliants (you may have previously tried some hyaluronic acid serums). However, as we all know, popularity doesn’t always equate to efficacy. Hyaluronic acid apparently has several uses that you might not be aware of, such as the distinction between it and sodium hyaluronate or the ‘99% hyaluronic acid’ serum claim that is actually a blend of hyaluronic acid and water. Thus, the question: Are we truly certain that we are familiar with this substance and why is it used in so many cosmetics?

As Kerry Benjamin, aesthetician and creator of the top-selling hyaluronic acid serum, Stacked Skincare, explains, “Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring polysaccharide present in the human body.” Our joints, nerves, hair, skin, and eyes all benefit from its shock-absorbing and lubricating properties. In reality, hyaluronic acid is what provides the skin its suppleness and resistance in addition to moisturizing and safeguarding it by bolstering the skin’s outermost layer, which serves as a barrier against external agents. It is generally a safe element for all skin types, however dry skin sufferers can benefit the most from it. It is generally a safe element for all skin types, however dry skin sufferers can benefit the most from it. Hyaluronic acid may need to be tested on people with rosacea or eczema to ensure that it does not affect their skin. Prudvi Kaka, the chief scientific officer of DECIEM, a company that manages brands like The Ordinary, claims that a hyaluronic acid serum’s effectiveness is determined by its molecular weight: “The deeper it can permeate into the different skin layers, the lower the molecular weight. The deeper skin layers cannot be penetrated by hyaluronic acid because of its larger molecular weight.”

Serums that advertise being created with 75%, 99%, or even more hyaluronic acid should be avoided because they are actually made with sodium hyaluronate. Benjamin continues, “Sodium hyaluronate is not in pure form; it is in solution. It originates from 1% to 2% of the solution, which is primarily made up of water. In other words, the skin may get dry if the solution includes more sodium hyaluronate than 4%.He uses the comparison of how too much salt on a sponge will cause it to lose water and become dry to demonstrate his point. Similar to sodium hyaluronate, which acts like a salt rock when consumed in excess. For instance, The Ordinary’s Hyaluronic Acid 2% + B5 serum is made with various molecular weights combined with a significant amount of water to help the skin become more elastic and firm, delay the onset of signs of aging, and, most importantly, safeguard the skin barrier, the epidermis’ most superficial layer that must always be protected. Without taking a product to a lab, we can’t be sure how much sodium hyaluronate or hyaluronic acid is actually present in the formulation of a product, but it is unlikely to believe products that claim to include a component that is more than 10% pure. A salt rock would be the item that was genuinely manufactured with 90% hyaluronic acid, according to him. Dr. Benjamin explains, “So it’s probably not actually 90% Hyaluronic acid, it’s 90% of the whole solution, which is mostly constituted of water.”So you’re familiar with the serums that boast to contain 75 or even 99 percent hyaluronic acid? They are not, though. Benjamin continues, “Sodium hyaluronate is not in pure form; it is in solution. It is delivered as a 1% to 2% solution that is primarily made up of water. In other words, according to Benjamin, if a solution includes more sodium hyaluronate than 4%, the skin may become dry. He uses the comparison of how too much salt on a sponge will cause it to lose water and become dry to demonstrate his point. Similar to this, too much sodium hyaluronate might have the reverse effect because it is a salt rock. Regarding those deceptive percentages, Benjamin claims that without taking a product to a lab, it is impossible to determine the precise amount of hyaluronic acid or sodium hyaluronate that is present in a certain product. Regarding those false percentages, Benjamin claims that without taking a product to a lab, it is impossible to determine the precise amount of hyaluronic acid or sodium hyaluronate that is present in a certain product. He claims that a salty rock would be created if a product contained 90% hyaluronic acid Therefore, he concludes, “it’s probably not 90% hyaluronic acid , it’s 90% of the whole solution, which is primarily constituted of water.

In terms of form, it is most frequently applied topically in the form of serums or gel lotions. However, it is also applied as a supplement or for filler injections, so we strongly urge you to speak with a doctor first. Since hyaluronic acid is so closely related to naturally occurring chemicals already found in the body, there are actually no documented negative effects of hyaluronic acid. Instead, most reactions are caused by the injection itself, not the hyaluronic acid.

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