Exploding Fashion: From 2D to 3D Animation

If you’ve been following Central Saint Martins social medias , you might be curious about how the 3D animations in “Exploding Fashion” were created.

The CentralSaintMartins researchers gathered examples of model postures, gestures, and movements from each historical era in order to create a historicized animation for each outfit. The two models, Kitty Garratt, a fit model, and Kate Coyne, a contemporary dancer, used this as the foundation for their performances in the motion capture studio.

@curlycurlmedia

If you’ve been following Central Saint Martins social medias , you might be curious about how the 3D animations in “Exploding Fashion” were created. The CentralSaintMartins researchers gathered examples of model postures, gestures, and movements from each historical era in order to create a historicized animation for each outfit. The two models, Kitty Garratt, a fit model, and Kate Coyne, a contemporary dancer, used this as the foundation for their performances in the motion capture studio. #centralsaintmartins #k #anime #manga #warhammer #power #art #makima #denji #animeedits #otaku #centralsaintmartins #chainsawmanedit #knitting #animeart #tenunjepara #tenunrangrang #tenunnusantara #tenunbaron #animememes #tunik #bajutenun #tenuntroso #tenunsby #tenundobbi #saltenun #curlycurlmedia #curlycurlfactory#curlycurlfashionsociety

♬ Piano instrumental. It is an image of a quiet sea – Yukari Okano

They got inspiration for this redone MadeleineVionnet dress from the @madparis collection from three design registration images taken in 1921 that depict how her model wore it. A 360-degree impression of the dress’ fit, drape, and behavior on the body is provided by the triptych, which features three images of the garment. Then, in her performance, Kitty Garratt used and reworked this.

The researchers chose from both models when choosing the film for the final 3D animations so that the avatar could move in one direction using the motions of the fit model and then pivot and move in the opposite direction using those of the contemporary dancer. Up to six motion recordings were synchronized together in some walks. As a result, the avatar was never based on just one performer but rather a combination of both: part fit model, half modern dancer.

Don’t miss out on this ground-breaking research project by Central Saint Martins on pattern-cutting in twentieth-century fashion, “Exploding Fashion: From 2D to 3D Animation,” which is on display at Fashion Museum Antwerp through 05.02.2023.

Advertisement

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s